Posts Tagged ‘noir’

 

Andrez Bergen announces “ASP’s ‘The Tobacco-Stained Sky’ anthology is now out there!”

Like a fine drop of wine filtered into a dusty bottle stuck down in a dark, dim underground bunker, we’ve been brewing — er, cellaring — the anthology The Tobacco-Stained Sky for over a year, and now (at last) the beastie has been published.

It’s just appeared on Amazon, but you can pick up the trade paperback direct from the publishers (Another Sky Press) for $5.46 + ♥ + postage.
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Gordon Highland is in ‘The Tobacco-Stained Sky’

“A couple of years ago, I read Andrez Bergen’s excellent post-apocalyptic sci-noir novel Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat and began a correspondence with the author, interviewing him for The Velvet and keeping in touch all friendly-like, as we do. A few books later, he re-approached Goat‘s publisher, Another Sky Press, about releasing an anthology of stories by other authors that he compiled (along with co-editor Guy Salvidge), all set within the well-developed universe of that first novel. I immediately jumped on board as a contributor, taking it as a challenge to write my very first story in that genre.”
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TSMG one of the Books-of-2012?

What a great way to finish off the year. Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat popped up as one of the novels-of-2012 thanks to the people at Dark Wolf’s Fantasy Reviews: “One of the best discoveries of 2012, Andrez Bergen’s debut novel is a delight, both for the noir/post-apocalyptic story and the tribute brought to classic movies.”
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Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat review @ Dark Wolf’s Fantasy Reviews

Bookshops seem to be one of the endangered species of nowadays. It saddens me, more so since I love walking the bookshops’ aisles in search of new books, be them written by familiar and dear writers or by the new, waiting to be discovered, authors. And when a reader finds himself faced with a name that is a mystery at the time of the search, the cover is one of the things that attract – however the book titles are not to be neglected. This was the case with “Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat”, although the search did not take place in a physical bookshop, a title that allured me towards Andrez Bergen’s debut novel and pushed it on my reading table.
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Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat review @ Dead End Follies

Some people I know could kill for an original idea.

Other people I know have originality broken down and streaming in their blood. Life’s unfair. Andrez (really, Andrew) Bergen belongs to the second category. He has the Originality Gene in his DNA. TOBACCO-STAINED MOUNTAIN GOAT might be quoting and referencing about a hundred pop culture products, but all put together, it adds up to something you’ve never read before. A twentieth century obsessed law enforcement worker in a secluded city, in a distant and totalitarian future. Yeah, exactly. It’s as crazy as the premise sounds. But beyond being crazy, it’s a bold, borderline reckless experimentation with storytelling.
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Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat review @ The Nameless Horror

I’m waaaaaaay later (to the tune, Finder tells me with its ‘file info’ stats, of a whole year) to this than I wanted, and I haven’t yet even finished it, but here’s the non-quite-complete book review for Andrez Bergen’s superbly-titled darkly humourous sci-fi film noir hybrid thing Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat.

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Andrez Bergen interview by Julie Morrigan

Tobacco-Stained Mountain Goat is sci-fi-lite, at least according to one of my mates — which surprised me since I believed it safely slotted into the sci-fi genre and I didn’t know there was a style called sci-fi-lite. Probably he was making it up.

“Most people are now telling that TSMG is far more oriented toward noir than science fiction, which I guess is Read more…


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Andrez Bergen interview @ neo-noir site The Velvet

“I’m chuffed you like that angle, since it came later on in the development of the story. Floyd, for me, always was a bit of a cynical last-hero-standing, a kind of Charlton Heston type circa Planet of the Apes or The Omega Man. Read more…